Phone: 480.500.7443
8700 E Via De Ventura #130, Scottsdale, AZ, 85258
Send us an Email

The Science & Facts of Hair Loss

Intro to Hair Loss

Hair loss, quite simply, is the visible result of a hair follicle that is no longer viable and therefore unable to grow hair. The lack of viability can be either permanent or temporary, based on the underlying cause(s) and the effectiveness of timely treatment. When a hair follicle is destroyed, it does not regenerate… it never comes back, and the hair loss is always permanent.

Hair loss factors include genetics, hormones, age, health, nutrition, environment or stress and can be initiated by surgery, prescription drugs, testosterone or estrogen problems, thyroid problems, iron-deficiency, illness or trauma.

Learn More

Hair Loss, Self-Image & Society

Throughout man’s time on earth, hair has played an important role in making a statement about oneself. Hair and its appearance could reflect beauty, modesty, pride, discipline, adventure, daringness, cleanliness, scruffiness, etc. So much so, the military and prisons crop hair very short or even shaved to create uniformity and remove individuality.

 Learn More

Hair Anatomy

See anatomical diagrams of the hair shaft, root, papilla, capillaries, and more…

Learn More

How Hair Grows

The growth and shedding cycle of the hair follicle is divided into three distinct phases. These phases are known as anagen (the growing phase), catagen (the intermediate phase) and telogen (the shedding or resting phase).

Learn More

How Hair is Lost

The growth and shedding cycle of the hair follicle is divided into three distinct phases. These phases are known as anagen (the growing phase), catagen (the intermediate phase) and telogen (the shedding or resting phase).

Learn More

Hair Loss in Women

It is estimated that perhaps 40 percent of women will experience some degree of hair loss. The loss can be related to some underlying illness, hormonal change after menopause or other conditions.

From ancient times up to the modern day, hair has always been a key aspect of female beauty and has often been described as a woman’s crowning glory. Look at the numerous advertisements promoting shampoos and conditioners. Who doesn’t remember the Farah Fawcett ads of the 1980s or the current Jessica Simpson ads displaying a lush, gorgeous mane. If a balding man walks into a room full of people no one takes a second look, yet a woman with very thin hair walks into the same room, all turn around to gawk. Why?

Learn More

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia is a type of hair loss in which certain hair styles, harsh chemicals (for hair straightening and styling), and thermal styling tools cause significant damage to hair follicles that leads to hair loss. This damage can be severe enough to pull the hair root out completely or effectively destroy the root to the point where the hair falls out.

Learn More

Hair Loss in Men

In men, the term “common baldness” usually means male-pattern hair loss, or Androgenetic Alopecia. Male-pattern hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss in men. Men who have this type of hair loss usually have inherited the hair loss trait from either their mother’s or father’s side of the family.

Men who start losing their hair at an early age tend to develop more extensive baldness. In male-pattern hair loss, hair loss typically results in a receding hairline and baldness on the top of the head.

Learn More

Norwood Hair Loss Scale

Most hair replacement surgeons refer to hair loss in stages as defined by the Norwood classification published in 1975 by O’Tar Norwood. It is the most widely used classification for hair loss in men in the world. It defines two major patterns and several variations of hair loss.

In the standard Norwood pattern, two areas of hair loss—a bitemporal recession and thinning crown—gradually enlarge and coalesce until the entire front, top and crown (vertex) of the scalp are bald with natural angles.

Most hair loss follows a predictable pattern although variations occur frequently. The stages of hair loss displayed are useful in determining baldness in most men. The following charts have been helpful for doctors and patients in determining the extent of the hair loss in males.

Learn More

Frontal Hair Loss

The most dramatic area of the head, in those suffering from hair loss, is the frontal area. This tends to cause a man to look bald or older even with only a slight loss of hair. It is common for men with minimal hair loss to seek a hair transplant. Most men with frontal hair loss are excellent candidates for follicular unit hair transplants.

Learn More

How to Stop Hair Loss

Androgenetic hair loss (pattern baldness) affects 40% of all women and 50% of all men. There are a multitude of products sold in salons, pharmacies, on television, radio or websites that promise to regrow your hair no matter how extensive the hair loss. They show amazing before and after photos which are nothing short of miraculous. Unfortunately, unscrupulous companies have found hair loss individuals willing to purchase any product that promises hair growth.

Learn More